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More stories by an amazing author...

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If you are easily offended, it’s best not to read Lansdale’s “On the Other Side of the Cadillac Desert with Dead Folks” story as your introduction to his work.  The first Lansdale story I read was “The Long Dead Day” [discussed in The Dead That Walk].  I loved the story, but forgot who the author was soon after.  [I spent my whole summer reading zombie anthologies one after the other and sometimes its hard to keep track of authors.]  Later I came across a story involving his fictional character, Reverend Jedidiah Mercer, called “Dead Man’s Road”.  That story was likewise phenomenal, and unfortunately the book in which it was originally published has since been out of print.  The third story I came across was “On the Other Side of the Cadillac Desert with Dead Folks” [found in Zombies : Encounters with the Hungry Dead and discussed in this blog].  I was offended at first, and it took me awhile to wade through those feelings and begin to appreciate the story.  When I did, I realized wha…

Lansdale, Joe R. "Bumper Crop"

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[caption id="" align="alignright" width="186" caption="Cover of Dead in the West"][/caption]


If you are easily offended, it’s best not to read Lansdale’s “On the Other Side of the Cadillac Desert with Dead Folks” story as your introduction to his work.  The first Lansdale story I read was “The Long Dead Day” [discussed in The Dead That Walk].  I loved the story, but forgot who the author was soon after.  [I spent my whole summer reading zombie anthologies one after the other and sometimes its hard to keep track of authors.]  Later I came across a story involving his fictional character, Reverend Jedidiah Mercer, called “Dead Man’s Road”.  That story was likewise phenomenal, and unfortunately the book in which it was originally published has since been out of print.  The third story I came across was “On the Other Side of the Cadillac Desert with Dead Folks” [found in Zombies : Encounters with the Hungry Dead and discussed in this blog].  I was of…

Another super creepy anthology...

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I really enjoyed The Dead That Walk because the stories felt very fresh and new.  I was accustomed to reading zombie literature and feeling terror and revulsion, but not really any sorrow or sympathy before.  The stories were also very unpredictable – which can be difficult to achieve in and of itself.

Each story is preceded by an author biography, which is one characteristic that I look for in anthologies of any kind.  I like to read about the author’s life and the circumstances that influenced their work.

Some standout stories -

“For the Good of All” by Yvonne Navarro.  This story was a thriller from beginning to end.  While I was reading it, I thought I understood what was going on, and I couldn’t figure out why the author had chosen to be so mysterious.  By the time I finished the last word I realized that I had no idea what was going on, and the ending absolutely floored me.  I read it again, in fact, to make sure that I hadn’t left out any details.
“The Crossing of Aldo Ray” by West…

Jones, Stephen. "The Dead That Walk"

I really enjoyed The Dead That Walk because the stories felt very fresh and new.  I was accustomed to reading zombie literature and feeling terror and revulsion, but not really any sorrow or sympathy before.  The stories were also very unpredictable – which can be difficult to achieve in and of itself.

Each story is preceded by an author biography, which is one characteristic that I look for in anthologies of any kind.  I like to read about the author’s life and the circumstances that influenced their work.

Some standout stories -

“For the Good of All” by Yvonne Navarro.  This story was a thriller from beginning to end.  While I was reading it, I thought I understood what was going on, and I couldn’t figure out why the author had chosen to be so mysterious.  By the time I finished the last word I realized that I had no idea what was going on, and the ending absolutely floored me.  I read it again, in fact, to make sure that I hadn’t left out any details.
“The Crossing of Aldo Ray” by West…